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  • gunder_bc

    gunder_bc

    March 11, 2015, 8:56 am

    There can be a fair amount of room to move things around, actually.

    A set of instructions might spend a fair amount of time setting things up. Consider:

    1) put value 1 in spot A

    2) put value 2 in spot B

    3) put value 3 in spot C

    4) add value 1 and 2 and put the result in D

    5) add value 2 and 3 and put the result in E

    6) add value in D to value in E and put in F

    you could write it in that order: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. Or you could do 1, 2, 4, 3, 5, 6. Or you could do 2, 3, 5, 1, 4, 6. They all result in the same values being in the same spot after the same number of instructions are executed.

    Much more complicated sequences can be constructed that can be reordered in much more interesting ways.

    This is a lot of what low-level optimization is about. Fortunately, the compiler, and to some extent, even the CPU itself, take care of that these days. There are a whole whack of tricks that you can use when you want to make a piece of code run screamingly fast, and knowing how the instructions are actually being executed is an important part of that.

    Reply

  • Immersed

    Immersed

    March 11, 2015, 6:23 am

    >I'm sure I'm a bit shy as well as neurotic

    I hope you realize how self-defeating your statements are.

    I am happy that I inspired you. In fact if you get this before you retire for the night, I challenge you to go to the nearest Starbucks tomorrow morning, and ask the person standing next to you if they have yet tried the new seasonal pumpkin-spiced latte. The conversation doesn't have to go anywhere, just engage, and the ball will fall where it may. Good luck!

    edit: If theres no one in line, walk out and try again later

    Reply

  • shrimpscumpi

    shrimpscumpi

    March 10, 2015, 2:46 pm

    Actually, the issue with the word hermaphrodite isn't derived from the Semenya issue, it's a lot older than that.

    The term 'hermaphrodite' is considered derogatory because of the efforts of medical practitioners, starting with the advent of the medical exploration of intersexual individuals at the turn of the century, to establish a set definition of intersexed conditions in such a way that allowed them to bring ambiguously sexed individuals back into a dual-gendered society, usually through social reconditioning and surgery. Individuals whose sex did not fall into the clear categories of male or female were seen as threats to the structure of society. This tradition uses gonadal tissue to determine the type of hermaphrodite (specifically gonadal tissue as well, not all reproductive organs. So, with Semenya, technically she wouldn't have been a hermaphrodite, she would have been a psuedohermaphrodite). Male psuedohermaphrodites have male gonadal tissue, female psuedohermaphrodites have female gonadal tissue and true hermaphrodites have both male and female tissue. Using this methodology, medical practitioners would perform corrective surgeries and advise social reconditioning for a particular gender based specifically off of the gonadal tissue. Though this isn't used to determine sex anymore, the terminology still exists.

    John Money came up with an alternate theory in the 50's (I think?), saying that it was more important that individual's genders match their outward sexual expression than their gonads. This is the methodology that is still being followed today, where the clit or penis of a baby with ambiguous gender is primarily used in the sexual corrective surgeries to determine whether or not they are going to have surgically created, purely male or female external sexual expression.

    That's a lot of information and I apologize if it's poorly presented, but a lot of politically active intersexual communities find the term hermaphrodite to be incorrect and to an extent insulting, because it's based off of medical methodologies that they feel are inaccurate and damaging ways of defining the very delicate subject of gender/sexuality, which intimately affects how a person is able to experience their life. They tend to prefer intersexual because it does include a broader range of sex conditions, and also because it doesn't have this historical connotation.

    Anyway, just wanted to add in a bit more history behind that :)

    tl;dr: "Hermaphrodite" is connected to a societal need to correct gender abnormalities as well as archaic and emotionally damaging ways of determining future genders, whereas "intersexed" is not.

    Edit: For coherence, sorry, long day.

    Reply

  • genida

    genida

    March 10, 2015, 8:12 am

    This is what bugs me about it. I want the show to be good, hopefully going for the end twist of the book(second flash forward, spoilers if you want...).

    But here they're going for the 'it-will-happen-anyway' plot, which is complete and utter crap. If that happens I'll never watch the show again.

    I don't remember much of the book but in that the flash forward period of time everything changed when they actually got to it. Though some people had fun and re-enacted the moment down to the last detail.

    At some point I wish they'd just come out and say it, like 'I saw my husband in my future but now he's dead'. Must've happened.

    Reply

  • HeikkiKovalainen

    HeikkiKovalainen

    March 10, 2015, 11:10 am

    It requires no skill to push a button. That one button gives you 80 extra horsepower. Aero development means you must have skill to put it really to use. I realise you have strategies to efficiently use KERS but if I am overtaking a car, pull beside him hit one button and get in front it isn't skill doing the driving. If I had the money spent on aero development I would have to try and overtake him on the inside or outside of a corner or using slip stream. This requires a lot more skill.

    I'm all for technology as well but I'm also for naturally aspirated engines in F1 and I don't see this as natural aspiration (even though technically it is).

    Reply

  • elshizzo

    elshizzo

    March 10, 2015, 9:04 pm

    This is stupid old political thinking.

    Two ways why your theory is wrong.

    One: If democrats don't pass meaningful health care reform, their base will become dispirited, and don't show up to vote, OR they take them out in primaries, OR they vote 3rd party.

    and more importantly

    Two: If democrats DO pass meaningful health care reform and it WORKS, a lot of moderates who used to vote republican will become newly democrat voters because they see democrats improving shit.

    Ofcourse this stupid game theory labels people on a static spectrum which ofcouse represents nothing of what is reality

    This reminds me of why I have a low regard for political "science". Politics isn't a science, and stop trying to play games with voters!

    Reply

  • ychromosome

    ychromosome

    March 10, 2015, 3:34 pm

    I forgot to add one more thing - it quite possible that some of your Indian students think that they *don't have the authority* to do some of these things such as call the cable company, get a telephone number, make photocopies, etc. I know that sounds unbelievable, but it's true. You won't believe the kind of restrictions that some of the Indian schools and bureaucratic institutions place on the people they are supposed to serve. I can assure you that 99.99% of the schools and colleges in India wouldn't let students use the school's photocopiers or printers on their own. There would be a clerk or attendant whose job it would be to assist students with these things, usually in exchange for a fee, and this assistant would act like he is lord of the manor. Hell, this was true in the *office* I used to work at in India, which was supposed to be one of India's foremost software services shops. They had a photocopy guy and we had to give him our pages to photocopy, to be added to a queue and come back later to collect the copies. Sometimes, he would not be there to help us, the 'photocopy room' would be locked, and we would have to wait for him to return. They wouldn't even leave the room open for us to make our own copies! I bet it still runs this way at that office.

    So, if they are coming from that background, these people might actually be under the impression that you are the only person who can get these things done for them and that they shouldn't do it themselves. That might explain the shock.

    Reply

  • snuxoll

    snuxoll

    March 10, 2015, 1:17 pm

    It's a forkbomb, the description is in what you just ran. Here, let's format it properly first.

    :() {

    : | :&

    };

    :

    Oops, still not readable enough, how about:

    fork() {

    fork | fork &

    };

    fork

    The first part defines a function called `:`, this recursively calls itself and pipes the output into another call to itself that is then run in the background (this makes the command complete so you get control of your terminal back). By doing this, the function calls itself over and over, abusing your system memory and CPU time until it's barely functional.

    Reply

  • TapiocaSunshine

    TapiocaSunshine

    March 10, 2015, 2:48 pm

    Interestingly though:

    I had a break that put me in a wheelchair for a month. It happened at the ankle, where the bottom of my foot was pointed up. But it was in a really intense sports situation where I had tons of adrenaline. The doctors told me later that the adrenaline kept me from feeling much of the pain. It hurt like hell but it was an odd, sort of far away pain. In the ambulance I was administered a shot to slow down my heartbeat and it did nothing. I'd love to learn more about sports injuries, or just generally about what can happen when the body is in fight or flight.

    Reply

  • anothergoogler

    anothergoogler

    March 10, 2015, 10:29 pm

    Not to hijack the thread, but it really depends on the product / department. Our developer support is excellent and mostly handled through forums (with real live engineers helping out), which we do spend quite a good deal of time looking over. For other products, we always try to make our 'contact us' pretty apparent, which does get to a real person (eventually). Because of sheer volume, a lot of that support is handled through electronic means. While it's true that it's easier to know someone at Google, we do care about customer and developer happiness a great deal and pretty much any Googler will go out of their way to help said person if needed. : )

    Reply

  • ihaveausername

    ihaveausername

    March 11, 2015, 12:24 am

    > When I am opening a file, I want to open a file.

    I often use Open File dialogs to do other stuff. If I have the dialog open already, and figure I need to do something, it may be quicker to do it in the dialog than to open up a new Explorer window. For instance, I may want to move a file to another directory, change the file permissions or remove the read-only flag on a file. I often do these things in the Open File dialog. (If I see the file in front of me, why should I have to open up another Explorer window). I'm guessing there's a risk that I could loose some percentage of a percentage of a percentage of efficiency if Windows was limited to only opening files in the Open file dialog.

    Reply

  • exgoogler

    exgoogler

    March 10, 2015, 5:49 am

    First and foremost, the way contractors were treated. I was a full-time engineer (white badge), so I was afforded all the privileges you read about in the New York Times.

    Contractors, with a red badge, are not so lucky. As a contractor, you need to pay for the Google Bus. As a contractor, you are not allowed to go to TGIF on Fridays to mingle with your co-workers. In general, full time employees look down on the contractors as second-class citizens. Contractors are segmented off to their own part of the internal network, and can't get information necessary to do their jobs without approvals. For a company that prides itself on openness and freedom, this is embarrassing.

    Most contractors I knew aspired to become fulltimers, and would interview for the jobs. Rarely would they get them. Oh, and a year or so ago, when the recession started, Google cut 10,000 contractors. They just ended the contracts, so it's not a layoff. Sleazy, for a company that says "do no evil".

    Funny thing, some of the coolest people I met there worked physical security. There are these electric scooters that Googlers can take to and from meetings (if you can find one that fucking works, they're always broken, or some douchebag took the key and keeps it at his desk). One of the physical security guys taught me how to wheelie the scooters, and we would do jumps with them at lunch time. They were cool. The ops team, too. Good people.

    Reply

  • xoites

    xoites

    March 10, 2015, 1:29 pm

    I worked in a mass mailing house in Boston for two years back in the early 1980s. Most of it is done by machine although prior to that i did work in a print shop in DC and stuffed a lot of envelopes by hand. Never had anything to do directly with the people who opened the return envelopes, but i imagine they would probably get a kick out of anything interesting you want to send them as long as they could take it home and read it later. One thing is certain; their bosses want them to work as fast as they can for as little as they can pay.

    Reply

  • jamesinc

    jamesinc

    March 10, 2015, 3:59 pm

    Ok I scrapped my meaner response in favour of this. It's too early to say whether or not the proliferation of wireless signals will have any health side-effects. Yes there is a lot of background-radiation, but it's relatively weak compared to the signals produced by most stations, many of which you come into **very** close contact with, as opposed to say the 50MW transmitter for a local FM radio station, which is probably several km away.

    My own opinion is that as the types of radiation in question are all non-ionising, the odds of significant side-effects are very slim.

    Reply

  • ElectricRebel

    ElectricRebel

    March 10, 2015, 9:47 pm

    Why? If the government builds a road or funds a research project, what is fundamentally different than if the private sector does it? The good produced doesn't give a fuck who funded its production. Hell, some goods likely won't even come into existence if it wasn't for the government (e.g. things that are non-rival and non-exclusive). Until assurance contracts prove they are practical in the real world, tax-funded subsidies are the most efficient way to fund public goods. The private sector only works at producing scarce goods that are profitable. For example, this is why the music industry is failing right now. Their goods are no longer scarce thanks to the ability to copy bits for millionths of a cent and is therefore no longer profitable without the introduction of artificial scarcity through legal means (e.g. the DMCA) or technical means (e.g. DRM).

    Stiglitz's point was that economic activity resulting from "bad" activities shouldn't count.

    Overall, GDP is just a single measure. I personally prefer the Human Development Index, which is also flawed, but at least takes into account factors that matter to individuals in a society such as education attainment and health rather than the seemingly arbitrary measure of how much "stuff" we produce, which is never allocated very well among the members of society. Another interesting number to measure the raw output of a nation is to just use the number of kilowatt-hours consumed by a nation. For example, after the Soviet Union collapsed, the energy consumption of the CIS dropped for several years before it started to recover.

    Reply

  • silentbobsc

    silentbobsc

    March 10, 2015, 8:55 pm

    So what the fuck is with this Obama trying to get the Olympics in Boston? All I know is that I congratulated a Brazilian friend of mine on the good news and then the thread devolved into a "well good, because FUCK Obama trying to get them in Chicago".

    What's the BFD? Why can't a guy throw a bone to his hometown? I mean what gall for the President to try and bring in jobs, tourism, and ultimately income. So what if it was Chicago? Seriously, this is getting BEYOND FUCKING OLD.

    ... interestingly, I spoke with my Brazilian friend privately about the devloved thread and his response was simply - "You know how you guys are always bitching about how we see America as self-centered, arrogant, and ignorant? Well, it's because you guys can't even say "congrats" without falling into an argument about your own politics, it makes the rest of us think that you never made it past the 4th grade.

    Reply

  • thefugue

    thefugue

    March 10, 2015, 10:27 am

    And the only people it harms in the absence of price increases are the rich. And again, I'd point out that the stimulus package was a Bush administration policy, inherited by the current administration. You're essentially either A) complaining on behalf of those who are doing fine already or B) making an empty partisan argument. I agree with your argument as to the nature of inflation, however it's meaningless outside of it's impact on the real world. There are plenty of good arguments IN FAVOR of inflation in certain situations.

    Reply

  • MuuaadDib

    MuuaadDib

    March 11, 2015, 9:27 am

    Man, that is great. However, isn't this the proverbial drop in the bucket? I would really like to have hired servants who are suppose to be doing this job just do this job effectively, and start to realize that the cops are part of the problem. If we could somehow oh I don't know get good cops in there again, and demilitarize the current forces and move back to a peace office rather than a law enforcement office I think they might be able to win back the people.

    I would love to see them just honor their oath and just uphold what they promised to defend.

    Reply

  • marr

    marr

    March 11, 2015, 6:15 am

    Whoa there, careful with the absolutes. People will *never* be more logical? I think we took a pretty big step in that direction around the time of Gutenberg. Individuals can level up in rationality at any time, societies do it when it's driven by a popular movement or new technology. When it happens there is a ratcheting effect, and all else being equal, my money's on the more rational group in any conflict.

    So... Yeah. I do believe we will win.

    How does that imply that I'm naturally callous?

    Reply

  • Xhyce

    Xhyce

    March 10, 2015, 11:02 pm

    You are right - religious institutions should be treated as a business. Any and all exemptions they have should be revoked so we *all* have equal right to choose whether we want to make so much money that we have to pay for health insurance. If I choose to work at McD's to get free health insurance - I should be able to make that choice without being fined for making too little. If, on the other hand, I want to choose to get an education and partake in luxuries afforded by having a higher paying job - even if it means I now have to pay for my own health insurance - I should be able to make that choice without regard to my religious beliefs.

    Reply

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