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Vitamin D can be gained from the sun but deficiency is still common. When the future seemed within reach You seemed to enjoy my last video so here's another one, hope you enjoy.

A randomized, placebo-controlled, clinical trial of high-dose supplementation with vitamins C and E.

Categories: Impotence | cheapest cialis world

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  • adarksagea

    adarksagea

    March 10, 2015, 1:13 pm

    I work in HR for a Fortune 500 company, so let me tell you from a recruiter's perspective: when people have a cover letter, it makes me **much** more likely to pay attention to their resume. If the cover letter is addressed to someone in my department (or me), it's another major plus to your chances.

    Taking a few minutes to look up some basic info about the position you are applying for and a few more minutes to get even a basic understanding of a company's goals and values can make a huge difference. It's up to **you** to show **me** that you're worth looking at... don't expect that handing me a resume makes you worth more than a 10 second look at your qualifications.

    And yes, I'm serious about only looking at resumes for 10 seconds. Do it right or don't do it at all.

    Reply

  • topmojosun

    topmojosun

    March 10, 2015, 10:47 pm

    My best friend, and pretty much brother, was diagnosed with MS at probably 19 or 20, and boy was the first spell scary for everybody. He started with numbness in his hand, then arm, then chest, both arms, torso, legs, and was effectively paralyzed below the chest. After getting on medication, all but the subtle fingertip feeling in his hand has gone back to normal. He continued playing collegiate football, and regularly runs for miles every couple days. He really puts me to shame in the fitness category, but I'm still faster. He's become the poster child of his doctor's office and jokes about it regularly. Nobody but his closest friends and family knows he has it, and exhibits no outward signs of having it. When we travel, I do have to be on top of things around us because his daily stamina can die in a matter of seconds and we have to break and slow down for a while. He also becomes lethargic when blood sugars and such get out of whack. He just needs to eat regularly to keep everything in line, but it's scary to watch him go off his rocker and become completely delusional when those episodes occur.

    I really wanted to provide an anecdote for people not familiar with MS to get a better understanding. It's not a death sentence by any means, but it sucks like hell.

    I was wondering if you were able to take a look at your own MRI and if you could describe how you felt when you first saw the white spots. My friend's looked like swiss cheese, and he thought he was going to die in a few days because of it. He'll now joke about "having spots on his mind" in direct reference to the MRI when we're pondering stuff.

    Reply

  • wulfgang

    wulfgang

    March 11, 2015, 12:32 am

    They're raping us more prodigiously precisely because they have a powerful central government to manipulate. It's far more efficient which is why lobbying is so pervasive and profitable.

    See the 'Rick Perry signs executive order mandating Gardasil' story for example. With a few well-placed lobbyists and a pocket full of money Merck did with one stroke of the pen what might have taken years to accomplish if at all.

    Think of our government as a weapon pointed at you by corporate elites; do you want it to be a squirt gun or a .44 Magnum?

    Elites will always have their way with the government to one degree or another. Reduce the power of the government and you reduce their ability to rape and pillage.

    Reply

  • toolhater

    toolhater

    March 10, 2015, 3:18 pm

    I'm not complaining about my situation. I've been rather fortunate. I read rich dad several years ago. I live debt free and even though work has been slow the last year as a consultant, I still don't have to take the first job that comes to me. I passed on two offers this week because the pay was low.

    My favorite from rich dad is where he asks you to see how rich you are by seeing how long you can go without working. That was the best wisdom I ever read out of those books.

    But I cannot let my situation bias me on the realities of real life for other people. There are tons of people who lived beyond their means the last ten or so years, some even longer. They're paying the price for that now. However, there are some people who worked hard, saved their money, did their research, invested in securities that were AAA rated by ratings agencies whose job it is to review these things. Those people rubber stamped those securities and as a result, those people lost lots of money.

    Or look at the people who were invested in BofA. Their CEO was supposed to have the shareholders best interest in mind yet he bought Merryl Lynch when he knew that was a stinker (whether or not the feds made him buy it or not, he answers to the shareholders, not the feds). When this becomes a bust, the shareholders are wiped out. Sure they can hang on to the stock and it might come up to where it used to be but that is going to take year. What about the people that were planning on retiring soon? That money is gone. Before you say people should be conservative before going into retirement, first consider that banks were a conservative stock and secondly, even the people that were five years of retirement are going to have to be more aggressive in the last years of retirement, something no planner will advise. Meanwhile Ken Lewis, the guy who made this mess, gets show the door yesterday and his severance is in the multimillions. WTF?

    So people really don't get the same chances. When everyman fucks up he loses everything even if we was trying to do the right thing. When the elite fuckup the sky is the limit and how much they'll be rewarded.

    As for the rest of your advice, I'm there with you. One of the most important quotes I read was from William O'Neal the editor of Investment Business Daily who said in one of his books "it's not the work you do from 9 to 5 that is going to make you rich."

    Most people don't understand that but understand that there are some that follow that mantra and still get burned. Stocks are getting harder and harder to pick. Fundamentals mean nothing at times and I've had a hard time the last year when I picked good stocks at proper buy points. The weird thing is, I've bought stocks where lots of other investors bought ah three four times daily volume and then everyone got shook out at eight percent loss just like that. On no news or anything. I'm sure there are hedge funds out there shaking people down.

    Kiyosaki had a great article in yahoo finance the other day where he suggested investing for cash flow (rent) rather than capital gain(stocks) and to invest for inflation (oil,silver,etc). I'm planning on moving my portfolio in that direction even if it means someone is going to wake me up in the middle of the night with a busted toilet. At least I wont have to worry about hedge funds fucking me over.

    Reply

  • cairo140

    cairo140

    March 10, 2015, 10:08 pm

    I agree with your criticisms. I'll write a brief defense of my methods here that I didn't feel belonged in my original post.

    I agree that this form of game theory is pitifully weak as a normative tool, and I attempted not to write a prescriptive article. However, I think that models like these are useful from a positive standpoint to explain things like:

    * Why developed democracies breed moderate major parties

    * Why radical change may be harder to come by in developed countries

    I try to tackle the incentives and disincentives of moving along a linear political spectrum without regard for faith in party, voter turnout, or primary elections. It's unreliable, but I still think it's a useful analytical tool.

    I hate to seem like I'm brushing off your two critiques by declaring myself immune to real life (which I have done above), so I will try to address your two points now without dodging the question:

    > One: If democrats don't pass meaningful health care reform, their base will become dispirited...

    This is a very good point. I think that the model might benefit from including things like voter discouragement. However, I believe that the model may already adequately account for discouraged voters. If voters on the left become discouraged, they may simply be taken out of the political spectrum (accordingly, the area on the left will decrease, pushing both parties and the equilibrium point slightly to the right).

    > Two: If democrats DO pass meaningful health care reform and it WORKS, a lot of moderates who used to vote republican will become newly democrat voters because they see democrats improving shit.

    This point points out a significant flaw in my model because my model fails to account for party reputation, independent of position on the political spectrum. I could easily say that the phenomenon you posit would increase the population on the left side of the political spectrum, moving the equilibrium point left. But you and I will both agree that this is a weak defense. I have no adequate response to this criticism of the model, and I will concede it as a weakness.

    Reply

  • monximus

    monximus

    March 11, 2015, 5:52 am

    >sweeping conjectures

    Quality sweeping conjectures are so hard to find these days! Who can't miss the cinnamon taste?!

    >As usual, WSJ hides overbroad inflamatory conclusions in their opinion pieces

    **Smartin' Up Niggaz!** (Aka "Smarten up "niggers", Vote Obama!" on your kindergarten safety patrol neon orange strap!) Like that? Oh yeah, plus "work" in honornanohoreuim of workingsmart. He was a good ditch digger.

    >Redditors read carefully and see if there is anything else I missed

    No. Data? No.

    Reply

  • AngMoKio

    AngMoKio

    March 10, 2015, 5:31 pm

    >every day health care isn't that much more expensive here than elsewhere in the 1st world - it's just that the top of the line here is really sky's the limit.

    Very wrong. Every day health care in the US is 5x to 7x what I pay in my country. And my 'every day' health care is better.

    I'm a recent emigrant, so not being in the system I had to pay 'full ride' and settle my bill in full after each appointment.

    Doctors visit = $10.

    Specialist visit (2 hr appointment - head of the department) = $35.

    Er visit = $20.

    Drugs = $10 (depends of course on the drug.)

    And that is *with no insurance*.

    When I had a recent surgery in ANOTHER country (run of the mill - one of the most common surgeries performed period), at a private top of the line hospital the surgery would have cost $20k-$30k (I couldn't even get them to commit to a cost!) When I had *my* surgery it was $3k - I paid cash.

    Reply

  • aldaraia

    aldaraia

    March 11, 2015, 2:09 am

    I think it's a generalization, meant for people who are not incredibly experienced with computers, Mac or otherwise. The average user who does not take care of their PC will not run frequent virus scans, or have up-to-date firewalls etc, but on a Mac they will not have to worry about things like that. The average user may not know what they're doing and cause a huge crash and a possible system failure by playing where they shouldn't. In the case of Macs, it's very difficult to do something like that. I've been using a Powerbook G4 for about 3 years, before that I used PCs forever, and I've not once experienced a crash on my Powerbook. I take care of it physically, run system updates all the time, watch the workload I put it through and generally baby it, which I'll admit is more than I did with my PC laptop or desktop, but that mentality may be burnt into people's brain when they buy a Mac. They're getting a Mac because they *hope* it will crash less and get less viruses than a PC, or they generally like the aesthetic, or both, and subconsciously they know that they paid twice as much for an aluminum laptop, they'll unintentionally baby it and watch what they put it through.

    Reply

  • lar1

    lar1

    March 11, 2015, 6:33 am

    I've kept a mantis as a pet a few times.

    They only eat live insects. If your mantis is very small, you'll need to feed it small insects. Fruitflies (buy online or from a pet shop) work well for this and come in both wingless and flightless types. I recommend wingless, as the flightless tend to not always really be flightless. The best way to get the flies into the container with the mantis is to put the fly container in the freezer for 30-ish seconds (not much longer!) and then dump a bunch in. A D. melanogaster culture will last around a month in a deli container, so you'll either need to buy more cultures, or propagate the culture yourself. If you feed it well, it shouldn't stay small for too long.

    Once the mantis is bigger, you can feed it most any insect you find around. It's best if the food is smaller than the mantis (lacewings and moths are ideal), but larger food is okay, although if it's too large, the mantis either won't eat it, or will wait until it's very hungry to try.

    You'll want to spray some water in the enclosure with a spray bottle regularly-ish (you can see the mantis drink the water off the sides of the container), and provide some twigs from which it can hang.

    I'm not sure where you're located, but if it's winter by you, it might be more difficult to find a reliable source of food. Other than that, keeping a mantis is actually pretty easy. They're quite fun to watch, too! The only downside is that they live 6mo-1yr.

    tl;dr: Feed it fruitflies when small, most any live insect when large, mist with water, enjoy for ~6mo.

    Reply

  • gunder_bc

    gunder_bc

    March 10, 2015, 9:05 pm

    I had the same problem some years ago. It may not have been CT yet, but heading that way. Either way, I switched to an ergo keyboard (Msft Natural), and it helped a lot. Now even a single day of working on a non-ergo keyboard hurts. But I can type all day and have no trouble with the ergo.

    And it's not just Msft's ergo. As long as it's shaped basically the same, it works for me.

    I also picked up one of the Evoluent mice about a year ago, when I noticed my right wrist was starting to hurt again. Figured it was mouse related, and it seems to have cleared up since then. Still use a regular one at work, and it seems to be fine.

    Highly recommend both upgrades, and some time spent away from the keyboard and mouse... or at least with your hands away from them. Mix things up and it's hard to get a repetitive stress injury, yeah? ;)

    Reply

  • georedd

    georedd

    March 10, 2015, 12:42 pm

    You won't like it but there is a real reason.

    The reason is that the property usually has more value in the hands of the current owner/developer becuase they know the property and have marketing methods in place. Often it would cost the debt holder a large slow down in cashflow if they had to change controlling managers and have a change of personnel marketing the property to tenants. (This why for example Donald Trump has been able to renegotiate his debts on properties in the past instead of declaring bankruptcy - the debt holders knew the property will have more value under his name.)

    For the debt holder it's all about maximizing the return on the debt in default.

    Unfortunately for a homeowner in trouble it is usually the opposite - they are the least likely to maximize return on the debt becuase they are in trouble and not maximizing cash flow to the debt holder.

    Reply

  • USA_Rulez

    USA_Rulez

    March 10, 2015, 3:06 pm

    I guess it's different for government contractors then? Because when I was one I got way more perks than the regular employees.

    I also got paid almost 3 times what they made---of course I didn't get any other benefits, e.g. health insurance---but overall many of the federal employees envied my position (*That was a few years back though, I'm sure their job security is a huge perk for them now*)

    So that's why I've always found this other dynamic in private companies to be interesting.

    Reply

  • travis_of_the_cosmos

    travis_of_the_cosmos

    March 10, 2015, 9:46 am

    Both sports arose from the same game, called football; prior to the codification of the Rules of Association Football in the late 1800s different regions played with their own rules and using your hands was common in some areas. The North American variant of the game (sometimes called "Gridiron Football") diverged at that point, focusing more and more on on the use of hands and forward passes. Other variants include Rubgy Football and Australian-Rules football.

    What I find interesting is that the name "football" predates any prohibition on the use of hands.

    Source(s): I remember a lot of useless facts.

    Reply

  • CarlH

    CarlH

    March 10, 2015, 5:57 pm

    As with many such things, it is a matter of personal style and taste. Here is why I prefer this method:

    For me personally, when you go through code (skimming especially) you tend to notice the details of variable names more than details of the data type. If I was going through this for example:

    int height = 5;

    int *ptr;

    I would see height/`*ptr` pretty clearly, and just sort of know they are of type int from having glanced it with the corner of my eye, but focusing on the words "height/`*ptr`".

    With this however:

    int height = 5;

    int* something;

    It is a bit more possible to accidentally see "height" and "something" and think they are both int. This becomes more true when you have larger lists of such initializations. It just makes it easier to see at a glance in my opinion.

    Reply

  • ohai

    ohai

    March 10, 2015, 5:10 pm

    Counter-example: U-Haul owns a fleet of trucks that people can rent to move large objects. The side of the trucks are completely covered with with U-Haul logos & pricing. The grill of the truck still says "Ford" and the side of the truck still says "F-350".

    Anyway, I think you have a valid point, and whether or not a designer's logo appears on the site is something that should be negociated between client and designer. It could even be a surcharge that the developer offers for an "un-branded" website.

    Reply

  • snprbob86

    snprbob86

    March 10, 2015, 7:18 pm

    All of those little dialog launchers in the bottom right corners of the ribbon areas are places that their first-pass UI refactor didn't cover. For a first (public) attempt at redesigning the UI for some of the largest applications on the planet, they did a pretty damn good job. The "jewel" in the top left was an abomination of the branding department, which is being vastly improved in Office vNext.

    As for top vs side. I agree side makes sense for Word, but you need to also consider PowerPoint, Outlook and others. Excel and Access could fall either way depending on your data, but preventing horizontal scrolling where possible is a good goal.

    Reply

  • jputnam

    jputnam

    March 10, 2015, 11:21 am

    > It's perfectly in line with a single processor that does in-order execution. C is a great model for the 8086 (if you ignore memory segmentation)

    I wish people would stop perpetuating this. Consider the following snippet:

    shr ax, 1

    adc cx,0

    This can't be expressed in C; it must be encoded, and we must hope for a Sufficiently Smart Compiler to construct it. Or consider a routine to convert an int to a string:

    mov cx, 0xa

    loop:

    xor dx, dx

    div cx

    add dx, "0" ; the modulus

    push dx

    test ax, ax ; the ratio

    jnz loop

    ...

    ; calculating the length of the string

    mov ax, bp

    sub ax, sp

    sub ax, [frame size + local variables]

    This might be expressible using gcc-specific features, but not in a remotely nice way. What is does, for those unfamiliar with X86 assembly, is build the string on the stack. Since the stack grows from top to bottom, the resulting string doesn't need to be reversed.

    Reply

  • ddrt

    ddrt

    March 10, 2015, 2:17 pm

    I was pulled over in the smallest of small towns, Tama Iowa and I was headed to Cedar Rapids from Des Monies, he asked if I knew why he pulled me over and I said "I know, I was going way too fast. Thing is I've been driving for a while and I'm just in that zone you know? Hypnotized by the road and I had my cruise control on. Sorry" He asked for my license and went to his car, came back and said "thanks for your honesty, have a good night" and let me off. What a nice guy. I still hate cops in my city though.

    Reply

  • aldaraia

    aldaraia

    March 10, 2015, 6:12 pm

    I don't really know what to say. It seems you got a bad one out of the bunch, because so far as I can tell problems like that were not as widespread as PC crashes or failures such as that. Granted I didn't go and google "Macbook Pro, explosion, broken, battery problem" but I imagine I would have heard more in my browsing.

    I do know, however, that it is and has been a problem, not just with MBPs but with Powerbooks and iBooks and Macbooks, et cetera, and it seems to me that Apple was fairly quick about getting it cleaned up and replaced. I could be absolutely wrong about that, and given Apple's track record, probably am, but rest assured I know where you're coming from.

    Reply

  • CalvinLawson

    CalvinLawson

    March 10, 2015, 8:33 am

    Sure, here's some evidence. I spend much less than I make, saving my money and only buying nice things after making myself wait for a while. I do well financially, and I have a comfortable life without fear that I'll lose it all because I miss a paycheck or ten.

    So tell me, what about this isn't scalable? I understand that economics is complex, but the idea is to tighten the money supply in good times and loosen it in bad times.

    Instead we have deficit spending in good times and ruinous spending in bad times.

    Reply

  • thebrodels

    thebrodels

    March 10, 2015, 12:20 pm

    b.s. economics, b.a. design arts - i went to Lehigh so i guess it's a top 35 school i don't really know the rankings. college athlete, fraternity... i guess i should've majored in marketing, but that's like the dumb jock major and i wanted to separate myself from that and show employers that i have brains - so i majored in economics. design arts (animation) was sort of just for fun because I was in school for an extra year due to wrestling (my sport, had an NCAA Redshirt year). i am interested in digital marketing, and i have an internship right now at a website, but it's hard to get a job in this field right now. i am learning a lot now though, hopefully hiring picks up.

    my brother was in ibanking (credit-suisse) for a while, lots of work but that's good money. if you like that job that's good! when did u graduate?

    Reply

  • ohai

    ohai

    March 10, 2015, 8:37 am

    I have to disagree. Website design is not a service. If anything, it is more like manufacturing - a web designer puts the website together from start to finish and performs testing to ensure it functions properly. It is one thing if a company has their own IT staff that develop a website in-house, otherwise they are buying a custom made site manufacted outside of their organization.

    Besides, if you buy the TV at Best Buy, you see Best Buy's logo, if it ships by UPS, you see UPS's logo, if you watch CBS on your TV, you see their logo in the corner, if you watch Letterman on CBS, you see the Late Show logo and the logo for his production company (Worldwide Pants) after the show.

    Logos and marketing are everywhere, and there is no good reason why the manufacturer of a website shouldn't be mentioned somewhere on the site that they created.

    Reply

  • ZoeBrain

    ZoeBrain

    March 11, 2015, 4:11 am

    The female reproductive system is so much more complicated than the male one, I sometimes wonder how we ever manage to reproduce.

    All a male one needs is a single, partly functional gland. The rest we can do one way or another. For example, guys with non-mosaic Klinefelter syndrome (47xxy) are sterile - but not quite. By taking pinch biopsies of the testicular tissue, individual sperm cells can be dissected out, and used in IVF.

    I didn't have to go nearly that far.

    Conversely, everything has to be just exactly right to carry a baby to term. Even mild PCOS - polycystic ovarian syndrome - can prevent pregnancy. Most fertilised ova are miscarried, usually during the first few cell divisions, Many never implant.

    At least I have some control over my monthly cycle. I do have one, just that it gets totally overwritten by the massive hormonal intake, and I cycle my doses on a 28 day period.

    Reply

  • phuturo

    phuturo

    March 11, 2015, 7:27 am

    Sounds like just about every other tech company I have been at. Same BS different people. I avoid working for big company's like google (I worked for a big one for almost 9 years). Generally you don't get paid very well when you work for a big billion dollar company. But the trade off is that you generally work on some cool projects. You also learn a lot since you can afford to make mistakes.

    You left a little early to get into the crazy politics of big corporate money. I have made PM's cry, I have been yelled at by CEO's, have been in shouting matches with VP, directors and shitty managers and I still didn't get fired. I prefer working for smaller companies now were I can generally get things done rather quickly and with out to many hurdles.

    I think the corporate world is not for you (yes google is a big corporate whore) and if you go back into the field I am sure you would like working for a smaller company say with 50-300 employees.

    Start ups are fun but they can be very painful.

    Reply

  • X5452

    X5452

    March 10, 2015, 7:01 am

    Yes.....except that when you work extensively with kids, you can REALLY tell the difference between regular, excitable, outgoing, happy, rambunctious and mischievous kids, and kids with diagnosed ADHD. I am of the firm belief that you should always be giving kids an outlet to move and explore and be engaged, and every kid benefits from that. HOWEVER, there is a huge difference. ADHD can be a really tough thing to overcome and can really impair the kid's ability to function in our current systems. However unfair that is, it's the truth.

    Reply

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