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Today, turbocharging is common on both diesel and gasoline-powered cars. Patience.

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  • robeph

    robeph

    March 10, 2015, 6:25 pm

    Look, the reason we don't hear often about cops who do their job with respect and treat the citizens they interact with well, is because this is the expectation of the job. It should be considered the norm, no props for being a good cop, unless you do something extraordinary.

    Think about it this way, if your a programmer and you go to work every day, do your job at an average pace, turning out an average product, and doing exactly what is expected of you as an employee, do you expect to get rewarded? Of course not. If you don't go to work but half the days out of the week, treat your customers like trash, and don't generally do your job well, you will get fired. It doesn't seem to work like this for cops though, they do fucked up things and we see it posted and we get people complaining how not all cops are bad, we need balance, blah blah shut the fuck up. Every officer in any one department that does not instantly and harshly punish a police officer who exhibits behavior that a reasonable person would consider unbecoming of an officer is a bad cop; all of them. If they were good cops they'd perform their job up to the expectations of the post and criticize and punish the behaviors, rarely happens. You will notice that when cops are fired for their transgressions this is also posted, so the balance does lack on that point.

    No rewards for doing your job right. Your reward is your pay check. Just because you're respectful as a cop does not mean you're someone deserving of anything special. It is what is supposed to be done. Lowering that bar only helps fuck it all up.

    Reply

  • MassesOfTheOpiate

    MassesOfTheOpiate

    March 10, 2015, 3:23 pm

    A world without Graham crackers. It doesn't seem that unusual now that I think about it, but, growing up, I wouldn't have thought there was a place in the world you couldn't get Graham crackers. Of course, you don't grow up knowing about Mr. Graham and his Graham Diet, either. - But, I will say, Graham crackers are much better than that might make them out to seem. Tasty, sweet, not bland. Mixed with a little bar of chocolate, a sizeable marshmallow, and topped off with hopefully another Graham cracker. My childhood is finding this strange.

    Marshmallows on a stick or coathanger over the fire while camping in the woods. But I tried it more recently; it really wasn't quite the same experience. But I hope there's somewhere down there with Graham crackers.

    Reply

  • Jalkaine

    Jalkaine

    March 10, 2015, 5:40 pm

    Brooker in the past has mentioned his love just about all those shows mentioned above, and it was his constant ranting on "Screenwipe" about how "The Wire" was perhaps the greatest T.V. show ever written that made me sit down and pretty much watch the whole thing more or less back to back (hey, if your going to get ill and be confined to a sofa for a week, make the most of it).

    From an English perspective watching USA shows, the writers over there have really turned it all around. I can think of very few imports that i'd watch back maybe 8 or 9 years ago but the's so many now that have really up their game, and that admittedly comes down to the long story arks having replaced self contained episodic style writing that was so predominate prior to the Sopranos.

    What he's taken issue with I think is the fact that every networks trying to do it now, and for some of your larger networks it simply isn't going to work.

    For your HBO & Showcase type channels where they do shorter 13 episode runs they can build a story ark over a season and keep it well paced (Dexter is the best for this I.M.O) without dragging anything out too long where your larger networks tend to commission for 20+ episodes and they have less success at pacing them well (all those Lost filler episodes for instance).

    The bigger issue for the larger networks is the reliance on viewing figures as well, which is pretty much what's killed Heroes, which after all was a great idea but they've been trying to find a balance between what could essentially be a great geeky little story (Eureka style) and your mainstream action drama for those with A.D.D (24) which is what the popcorn munching masses want. And we all know what happens to a great show that drops below the prime time 7/8 million mark (i'm looking at you FOX) in the ratings.

    So what if a show ONLY get's 7 million. I bet the wire never got anywhere near that on HBO. But then it comes down to the advertisers and you can't argue with American Idle it appears.

    So anyway. Back to the point. At some point he's liked all the shows he listed. Hell, I liked most the shows he listed (never got the point of 24 myself) but shows need to be written as a seasonal ark and thought about properly upfront. They need to learn when to renew and when to give a show space in stead of axing it in week 8 (Defying Gravity) and FFS stop extending shows when the show has run it's course (I sent nuts for the Jerico campaign, but I swear I would have battered the Prison Break writers with a crow bar if someone had forced me to watch Season 4).

    The fun bollox he refers to is the major networks trying to hard to get that fine line between mass appeal and gripping t.v. that HBO & Showcase do so well. Flash forward could have been more intelligent with a wider scope rather than focusing on being another spooky FBI drama (Seriously guy Fringe & Warehouse 13 have it covered) as it was everything was crushed into episode one in a manic rush to try and impress people. I mean O.k. I guessed the link between the Doc and the kid after the kid said "Hi" (I'd seen the later revelation from the doc i the trailer) but the was no need to point the fact out 30 seconds after it was first hinted at.

    It was like "Hi, Major plot point here". No real thought required. So yeah, it was was fun bollox but no The Wire.

    Reply

  • lessthanjakedude

    lessthanjakedude

    March 11, 2015, 12:01 am

    Don't listen to him. We use a mixture basically. In science and engineering and anything involving measuring we use metric, on food packets we use metric, in school we use metric. Even the building trades are moving to metric dimensioned stock. On road signs we use yards and miles. Weight is normally still described in stone and pounds, and height almost always expressed in feet and inches. In conversation one will often use feet to roughly describe the size of something. It's horses for courses really, probably like the us as well.

    Reply

  • BestServedCold

    BestServedCold

    March 10, 2015, 6:04 am

    >Despite the increases in men seeking and receiving alimony, advocates warn against linking the trend to equality in the courtroom. Family court judges still tend to favor women, said Ned Holstein, the founder of Fathers & Families, a group advocating family court reform.

    >"Family court still gives custody overwhelmingly to mothers, child support overwhelmingly to mothers, and courts still give almony overwhelmingly to mothers and women," he said.

    >"The family courts came into existence years ago in order to give things to mothers that mothers needed," he said. **"The times have changed and the courts have not."**

    Reply

  • Kowai03

    Kowai03

    March 10, 2015, 10:47 am

    Lol well currently my DnD group is playing 4th Edition.. I have a Players Handbook as well as one other player. We share these around the table. My boyfriend is the DM so he has bought the 3 book pack which includes the handbook, DM guide and Monster manual (I have the handbook from that).

    I have a set of dice which cost about $12 I think? And I have a set of Rogue ability cards - I think they were around $20? Originally my boyfriend had made a campaign up himself but then he bought one later on, I don't know how much it cost.

    So I've really spent only about $30 total to play. I have a 3.5 handbook which cost $45 so I suppose I've spent $70-$80 total and I've played for a few years now.

    I don't know what Uni student couldn't afford that. You could easily put in for the three books needed to play, everyone buys their own dice and off you go. Much cheaper than Warhammer that's for sure.

    Reply

  • disembedded

    disembedded

    March 11, 2015, 4:59 am

    This is a very nostalgic picture. The photographer really managed to convey the sense of fresh cold air, and now I gotta put on some fallness kind of clothes. The timing of this picture is just perfect, with its hazy atmospheric aura! The weather's finally caught up with fall, and this morning was the first in I can't even remember how long that I woke up and had to put on a sweater. The sky looked just like this, and there were droplets of water on my window from a short drizzle we had. This is a fantastic image: the framing, the color and especially the use of soft focus on the house and the two on the roof are so evocative and perfect. The more I contemplate it, the more I enjoy it.

    Reply

  • collin_ph

    collin_ph

    March 10, 2015, 7:12 am

    I don't want our president to fail, but I don't want corruption and bad policy to win out either. In my mind, Chicago is a major center of corruption recently. I'm not happy that the US did not get the next Olympics, but Chicago does not hold a good place in my heart right now. I do not think the city is a good representation of how I see our country. As for Obama, I'm not sure the olympics effects his presidency.. Limbaugh likes to work himself into a fit and Beck is a comedian and 90% of what he says is at least somewhat tongue in cheek-- If it's good for the left, it's good for the right. I've heard it all both ways over the past few years, and no, I don't think the bickering, name calling, and focusing on the negative is a good thing for anyone. But ever since Bush (and probably even much before that), our government has started taking big chunks of our rights and our money. I can honestly say that I've had very little faith in our government for quite some time. I'm usually not a person to even pay attention to most politics -- I mean, so Bill got a BJ in the white house.. so.. I'm sure 100 other presidents did the same.. but then Patriot act happens, 2 happens, tax rebate checks (What the heck, just lower the stupid taxes), bailing out bad organizations that should just went bankrupt (and I blame bush a TON on this one), cash for clunkers, etc. We're tearing the free market apart and we don't even realize it.

    Anyway, I am definitely frustrated, and I know those guys are too. The libs have been frustrated for some time as well.. I mean, their guy is in power now, but we still face all of the same issues. It's hard to be happy when everyone's losing money and most of the government proposals ignore the underlying problem. JOBS. MANUFACTURING. GOODS. SERVICES. NOW-- not later. We all know what we need, and what does the government propose? Taxes on carbon, Taxes on cadillac health plans, Rules, restrictions.. where are the Jobs? Have you seen the pics of Detroit recently? It's a wasteland. How are we going to recover if we don't get the jobs back. We're up to 9.8% unemployment nationwide.. and that's for people that WANT to work. That's what's frustrating. I can help myself, but how can I help the rest of the country? it's hard.. and I believe that people who really care about our country sometimes get a little carried away. I don't think it's malice towards the country or a single person, but more of a mindset. I really think that the tides will turn politically in the next election cycle, but I have no idea if that'll help anything or not. I think that republicans and democrats alike caused this problem over the past 30+ years, and I don't think either party knows how to get us back out of the hole we're in -- I think some of the radio personalities (on the left and right) probably have the answers, they're just not the kinds of answers that get people re-elected, so they'll never be implemented.

    Anyway, I don't think people want the country to fail, they just believe that the policies are failed from the get-go.. so I think they want the world to get their opinion sooner rather than later so we can change before we make it worse. Just my opinion. But you're right-- getting excited about failure is not what I want my kids seeing.

    Reply

  • hobbified

    hobbified

    March 10, 2015, 8:59 am

    A funny example of degrees of freedom in linear systems that occurred to me just now (okay, maybe not for the first time *ever*, but it's an illustrative example anyway):

    You'll recall from geometry that any three points determine a plane. Let's apply this to furniture, by asking what the orientation of a chair is when all of its legs are on the floor.

    A "chair" with two legs is like a bicycle; always about to tip over unless you keep it balanced. This is because there's a range of orientations that the "chair" can take with the two legs touching the ground, and the lowest-energy one is the inconvenient one with the whole thing laying down. The system is *under-determined*.

    The bar-stool with three legs, on the other hand, is perfect. If all three legs are touching the floor (and the floor is flat) then it *must* be upright. The system has a *unique solution*.

    Then we have the usual sort of chair with four legs. If the chair is well-built and all of the legs are of the proper length, then it's possible for all of the legs to be on the floor at once. The system is *over-determined* but *consistent*. However all too often the chair is wobbly. Geometrically, if you pick any three legs and draw a plane through those three feet, the fourth foot will be out of the plane, so the chair only ever stands on three legs at a time. This is an *over-determined* and *inconsistent* system.

    Reply

  • shallah

    shallah

    March 11, 2015, 5:49 am

    quote:

    In the corporate practice dubbed "Dead Peasants" life insurance, companies wager on employees' lives, expecting to make money when they die.

    snip

    Dozens of blue chip companies have these policies, according to Myers. But only banks are forced to reveal them, and several have billions of dollars worth of policies.

    "The driving force behind it is the tax deductions," he said.

    The life insurance policies were designed to allow companies to insure a few crucial executives. Savvy companies then realized they could also get a tax break by insuring many lower-level employees.

    Reply

  • WritingImplement

    WritingImplement

    March 11, 2015, 4:23 am

    I agree. When I interned, I was on a team that pushed 6 times while I was there, and each time, it was a wonderful feeling knowing that the code I wrote was going to be used and abused by millions of people. :3

    The crappy PM thing is why I didn't try to get a job at Microsoft after interning with them. Honestly, I loved a lot of the people there, but the team giving me the offer would have an easier time convincing me to /wrist.

    It seems like "crappy management" is something you have anywhere you go.

    Reply

  • segoe

    segoe

    March 11, 2015, 6:50 am

    My favourite language would have:

    * pattern matching

    * closures with lexical scope

    * dynamic typing with optional annotations

    * garbage collection

    * polymorphism (as in Dylan)

    * first-class environments and reflection

    * macros (as in Lisp)

    * arbitrary precission integers

    * prototype-based OO (as in Javascript)

    * documentation at runtime

    * a simple module system, where you can do (require something) and it would search in all installed modules and import exactly what you need to use it, nothing more.

    * image-based loading/saving of a given environment or the whole system. (as in Smalltalk)

    Reply

  • shallah

    shallah

    March 11, 2015, 1:10 am

    Quote:

    In the corporate practice dubbed "Dead Peasants" life insurance, companies wager on employees' lives, expecting to make money when they die.

    snip

    Dozens of blue chip companies have these policies, according to Myers. But only banks are forced to reveal them, and several have billions of dollars worth of policies.

    "The driving force behind it is the tax deductions," he said.

    The life insurance policies were designed to allow companies to insure a few crucial executives. Savvy companies then realized they could also get a tax break by insuring many lower-level employees.

    Reply

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